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Fantasy Factory -  Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (2012)

From the proposal: The purpose of this fantasy factory will be to explore the effects of wearing an artist’s creations and being immersed in the terrain of an artist, and highlight the function of art as an escape into fantasy through the perception of a storyteller, or in this case artists. The Fantasy Factory will also serve to illuminate the process of creating a fantasy and all its parts, glamorous and plain.  The tented booth embodies the process of separating event from the product.  Exclusion, privacy, and mystery are parts of the mass produced fantasy provided by media.  The event could exist without the live feed projection, depending on resources available, but if included the live feed will reflect the recently developed need for reality in programming, or at least what is perceived as reality. The raw build up is what viewers ask for to dig deep past eyes that have seen so much falsified reality that it is hard to believe anything.  So why is this any better than what we can access through the internet or the television? It is because we can directly involve the viewer/participant in a one time collaboration of styles.  The opportunity is to not only give the participant the experience, but to dress him or her in it, and to give them something to take away from it. 

 

 

 

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Modelas En El Bosque -  Belalcázar, Spain (2012)

Collaboration and friendship blend together with humor mystery and whimsy in the photo set Modelas en El Bosque.  The mixture of the artist’s work and environmental and sentimental elements specific to the subjects and the geographical location, serve to illuminate the creation of new creative pathways caused by collaboration.   I was very lucky to develop a social and working relationship with two women who live in Belalcázar. It did not take long after introductions for me to pick up on their enthusiasm and passion.  I asked the two of them to participate in a photo shoot somewhere local and inspiring which comfortable and stimulating.  The term “Modelas” is incorrect grammatically, so of course when I used it we all had a good laugh, but then we decided that the creation of the proper noun fitted the situation.  In creating an opportunity for Lola and Paca to become models for art and fashion, we gave birth to new or rare experience, and thus a new title and a new facet of identity. Models were also asked to bring clothing and props in which they felt beautiful.  It was very important that the photo shoot be a collaboration, to echo the collaboration of the transitory artist with the location of his or her work.  I had a wonderful time with Lola and Paca, playing dress-up in the woods, sipping homemade Casera (coffee liquer), such interaction is high on the list of goals of a transitory artist in residence.  At the route of much collaboration is social relation, my interactions with Paca and Lola lend strength to the idea that art can be a bridge to meaningful social relationships, and mutual social appreciation can be a pathway to escalating levels of creative expression.

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Adaptores - El Posito, Belalcázar Spain (2012)

Photo Shoot, Pictures taken by Cory Clinton  As part of the Adaptores exhibition in Belalcázar and my residency at La Fragua, I was able to have a photo shoot with gallery goers.  With some attitudes conservative and some willing to let loose it proved to be an affective way to get to know people from the region and start a dialogue about the re-association of materials and crafting.

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The Palestinian Flag Love Bow (2013)

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A Bow A Bowie and The Countdown (2013)

A instance of parasitic exhibition (an uninvited opportunistic performative grasp at cache, we show up, perform, and take credit) with Tara Wrist, with a cameo appearance By Per Sia at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art San Francisco, CA, took place during the museums countdown for its two year period of closure for improvements.  In an ode to bold unprovoked exhibitionistic styles like, David Bowie, who’s face is depicted on the shirt of the artist, Hedwig, and Tara Wrist who accompanied bringing politically charged high fashion we say “Goodbye for now” to the SFMOMA. Thanks to Marc Gabbana for taking the photos.

Featured Pieces: The Great Palestinian Bow, Wings on Bowie, Ankle Cuffs

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The Industry (2013)

A towering head-piece appearing as a fashionable smoke stack, addresses the wearer’s body as a factory, illuminating art as an industry and the artist as fodder. Referencing fashion acts to reflect the sensationalist success system so directly attached to identity, that it may just as well be worn on the body.  The spectacle, monumental, and satirical. 

Materials:  Wire Mesh, Rolo Wrappers, Lanyard, Valentine's Day Candy Foil, A Belt, Heavy Duty Black Trash Bag.                    

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Fetish To Fashion (2012-)

This series is about transformation.  As our collective mind evolves so has fetish wear become fashion.  What was once solely kept private and quiet has become public, out loud loud and had evolved into something people want to be seen in and take pride in wearing.  Repurposed commonplace materials refer to the transformation and universal accessibility of the growing fetish-fashion industry.

 

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Smart Look (2012-)    

 

 

"Smart Look" (Lanyard, Wire Mesh) is my first use of parasitic exhibition.  In wearing my artwork to other people's shows I hope to gain cultural capital and caché, and to take advantage as well as exploit that of the host event.

 

I have always wanted to wear glasses, I look good in them, and no matter what anyone says, the fact that someone is wearing glasses allows them a little boost in perceived intelligence, depending on the person, it may be minute and it may be significant.  Living in the Mission in San Francisco, I saw a resurgence of thick black-rimmed geeky looking glasses.  It was as if the hippest of classes was wearing their nerdyness so loudly as to make it fashion and to affect real social change in aiding the transformation of geeky or nerdy from a negative to a positive.  Of course the site specificity of the tech boom also comes into play in this fashion metamorphosis. What I have brought into the world is a chic mockery, providing nothing but a smart look.